How?

Study, share, record, protect and preserve: NEARA's Toolbox

Studies, whether learning to decipher a language, do a land title search or delve into scientific specialties, are the building blocks for NEARA research. The NEARA Collection of books, research and archival material in the New Hampshire Technical Institute, Concord is a primary resource for information on our broad range of interests. This combined with “boots on the ground” field work and sharing idea and research through our publications form the frame work of our efforts to protect and preserve our heritage throughout New England and the Atlantic coast from Nova Scotia to Pennsylvania.

LIBRARY-booksThe rapidly growing resources, books, photo, archival material in the NEARA collection is now housed at rented space in the NH Conference United Chruch of Christ, Pembroke, New Hampshire. Members and others may borrow the circulating materials through inter-library loan.

RESEARCH-JAY4NEARA is committed to supporting interdisciplinary research related to lithic features. In order to promote this, the NEARA research and Special Projects Committee solicits and recommends projects, sets guidelines and standards, and is responsible for the review and updating of site reports. It is NEARA’s goal to maintain an accurate and comprehensive registry of sites in the northeast and ultimately to gain acceptance of that site registry as a reliable source of information for professional and avocational researches alike.

Publications-iconMembers receive the twice-yearly NEARA Journal which presents a wide range of articles, letters,and reviews. Both non-traditional and academic research are included, as well as evidence for transoceanic diffusion. The NEARA Transit, our informal newsletter, also mailed twice-yearly, keeps members up to date on news and calendar events of interest to members. In 1998 NEARA published, Across Before Columbus? Evidence for Transoceanic Contact with the Americas prior to 1492, which presents compelling analysis of artifacts, inscriptions, linguistic and biological traits suggesting numerous contacts over at least the last 5,000 years.