PUBLICATIONS

Publications-iconMembers receive the twice-yearly NEARA Journal which presents a wide range of articles, letters,and reviews. Both non-traditional and academic research are included, as well as evidence for transoceanic diffusion. The NEARA Transit, our informal newsletter, also mailed twice-yearly, keeps members up to date on news and calendar events of interest to members. In 1998 NEARA published, Across Before Columbus? Evidence for Transoceanic Contact with the Americas prior to 1492, which presents compelling analysis of artifacts, inscriptions, linguistic and biological traits suggesting numerous contacts over at least the last 5,000 years.

 

 Journal cover v 45-2002 

NEARA JOURNAL

The forerunner of the NEARA JOURNAL first appeared as a newsletter in 1964 and has evolved into an illustrated publication directed toward amateur and professional alike.

 As the primary means of communication for NEARA members, the Journal provides discussion of thought provoking data and interpretations of the lithic features found in the   northeastern part of America.

As a vehicle for the publication of both non-traditional and academic research, the Journal examines an expanding range of associated disciplines and explores their inter­relationships, contributing to a clearer understanding of the origins and purposes of American lithic sites. Members are encouraged to submit original material for publication.

Members receive the twice yearly NEARA Journal which presents a wide range of articles, letters, and reviews. Both non-traditional and academic research are included, as well as evidence for transoceanic diffusion including fascinating and informative articles by noted authors on a wide variety of lithic structures and associated features in the Americas and elsewhere. It is a premier forum of cutting-edge research on early lithic sites.

INTRODUCTIONS TO JOURNALS WITH INTRODUCTIONS

VOLUME 51 NUMBER1, SUMMER 2017

VOLUME 50 NUMBER 2, WINTER 2016

VOLUME 50 NUMBER 1, SUMMER 2016

VOLUME 49 NUMBER 2, WINTER 2015

VOLUME 49 NUMBER 1, SUMMER 2015

VOLUME 48 NUMBER 2, WINTER 2014

VOLUME 48 NUMBER 1, SUMMER 2014

VOLUME 47 NUMBER 2, WINTER 2013

VOLUME 47 NUMBER 1, SUMMER 2013

VOLUME 46 NUMBER 2, WINTER 2012

VOLUME 46 NUMBER 1, SUMMER 2012

VOLUME 45 NUMBER 2, WINTER 2011

VOLUME 45 NUMBER 1, SUMMER 2011

VOLUME 44 NUMBER 2, WINTER 2010

VOLUME 44 NUMBER 1, SUMMER 2010

VOLUME 43 NUMBER 2, WINTER 2009

VOLUME 43 NUMBER 1, SUMMER 2009

VOLUME 42 NUMBER 2, WINTER 2008

VOLUME 42 NUMBER 1, SUMMER 2008

VOLUME 41 NUMBER 2, WINTER 2007

VOLUME 41 NUMBER 1, SUMMER 2007

VOLUME 40 NUMBER 2, WINTER 2006

VOLUME 40 NUMBER 1, SUMMER 2006

VOLUME 39 NUMBER 2, WINTER 2005

VOLUME 39 NUMBER 1, SUMMER 2005

VOLUME 38 NUMBER 2, WINTER 2004

VOLUME 38 NUMBER 1, SUMMER 2004

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 2, WINTER 2003

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1, SUMMER 2003

VOLUME 36 NUMBER 2, WINTER 2002

VOLUME 36 NUMBER 1, SUMMER 2001

VOLUME 35 NUMBER 2, WINTER 2001

VOLUME 35 NUMBER 1, SUMMER 2001

VOLUME 34 NUMBER 2, WINTER 2000

VOLUME 34 NUMBER 1, SUMMER 2000

VOLUME 33 NUMBER 2, WINTER 1999

VOLUME 33 NUMBER 1, SUMMER 1999

VOLUME 32 NUMBER 2, WINTER 1998

VOLUME 32 NUMBER 1, SUMMER 1998

VOLUME 31 NUMBER 2, WINTER 1997

 Authors & Articles in Past Editions of the NEARA Journal:

  • James L. Guthrie ~ Commentary: Rameses II And The Tobacco Beetle  

  • Roslyn Strong ~ Carnac, Stones For The Living: A Megalithic Seismograph?  

  • Phillip M. Leonard ~ Tom Ogima In The Oklahoma Panhandle 

  • Johan H. Cooper ~ Ancient Greek Culture And Linguistic Influences In Atlantic North America  

  • Charles F. Herberger ~ Who Cleft The Devil's Foot: A Search For The Meaning Of An Elusive Symbol 

  • Betty Buckell ~ Norumbega On The Hudson  

  • James L. Guthrie ~ Epigraphy 

  • Suzanne Carlson ~ Loose Threads In A Tapestry Of Stone: The Architecture Of the Newport Tower 

  • Donald Y. Gilmore, William W. Fitzhugh, Brigitta L. Wallace ~ The Viking Millennium: A Smithsonian Saga Epilogue 

  • Duncan Laurie ~ The Radiant Landscape 

  • William Cary ~ The Pocumtuck Range, Megaliths And Coincidences 

  • Edwin C. Ballard ~ For the Want Of A Nail: An analysis Of The Function Of Some Horseshoe Or "U"-Shaped Stone Structures 

  • Charles F. Herberger ~ Theran Ritual  

  • J. Louis Bauer ~ Micmac Hieroglyphics, Were They Invented By The French? 

  • Betty C. Peterson ~ Painted Dreams, Native American Rock Art: An Examination Of A Tradition 

  • James L. Guthrie ~ Anatase In The Vinland Map

Articles From Past Issues of the NEARA Journal:

A Case for the Use of Above Surface Stone Constructs

Volume XL. No. 1, Summer 2006

Edwin C. Ballard & James W. Mavor Jr.

Nova Dania: Quest for the NW Passage

Volume XXXIX, No. 2

Suzanne Carlson

Carterfacts: George Carter on Diffusion

Volume XXXVIII, No. 1, Winter 2004

Collected writings by George F. Carter

Pre-Columbian Transoceanic Contacts

Volume XXXVI, No. 2, Winter 2002

Stephen C. Jett

Who Cleft the Devil's Foot

Volume XXXV, No. 2, Winter 2001

Charles F. Herberger

Carnac, Stones for the Living: A Megalithic Seismograph?

Volume XXXV, No. 2, Winter 2001

Roslyn Strong

Loose Threads in a Tapestry of Stone: The Architecture of the Newport Tower

Volume XXXV, No. 1, Summer 2001

Suzanne Carlson

Epigraphy

Volume XXXV, No. 1, Summer 2001

James L. Guthrie

Analysis of "U"-Shaped Stone Structures

Volume XXXIV, No. 2, Winter 2000

Edwin C. Ballard

North Atlantic Rim, Barrier or Bridge?

Suzanne Carlson

Did Glooskap Kill The Dragon on the Kennebec?

Volume XXXII, No. 1, Summer 1998

Roslyn Strong

Ancient Pemaquid and the Skeleton in Armour

Volume XXXII, No. 1, Summer 1998

W. Mead Stapler

ORIGINS The First Americans - Hot on the Trail

Volume XXXI, No.1, Summer 1997

Don Gilmore

The Pre-Columbian Lacquer of West Mexico

Volume XXX, No.1 2, Summer/Fall 1995

Celia Heil

The Little "Roman" Head of Calixtlahuaja, Mexico: Some Reflections

Volume XXVIII, No. 3 4, 1994

Romeo H. Hristov

Editorial from the Winter 2001 NEARA Journal:

Outside The Box

 One of our favorite New Yorker cartoons of recent years shows a man looking down at his cat beside the kitty litter box and admonishing the cat, "Never, ever, think outside the box."

 Regrettably, thinking outside the box seems to be reprehensible, even a dangerous virus, in some halls of academe, there very place where we should expect to find encouragement of the maverick researcher and his or her inquiring and exploring mind.  Tolerance of thinking outside the box, pushing the envelope, or whatever you want to call it, should be welcomed and rewarded, we submit, rather than punished with anti-viral prejudice.

 The French engineer in Thermodynamics, Pierre Mereaux, stepped well outside the box to analyze the enigmatic stone alignments and other lithic features of the Carnac region of Brittany.  His account of dedicated avocational research on this megalithic site was published in 1992, and Ros Strong has performed the monumental task of abstracting the essence of his book CARNAC: Stones for the Living for our consideration.  Mereaux's analysis is instructive, and the conclusions will challenge and intrigue you.  Are the alignments a state-of-the-art scientific instrument for ... ?  We won't give it away.  You'll have to read it!

 Never one to be confined to any box, our ever-curious and inquiring colleague, Dr. Charles Herberger, has contributed yet another stimulating think-piece, this time on that enigmatic symbol found on rock art on both sides of the Atlantic, the "paddle" or "palette" symbol.  Check your copy of Across Before Columbus? page 170 (David Kelley's paper on Proto-Tifinagh) for the Peterborough, Ontario, images of these palettes, hammers, or whatever they are, that, as Chuck points out, are ubiquitous in Europe.

 "Linguistic archeology."  Now, there's one that escaped the box, and John Cooper is on a word dig as he researches the meanings and associations of words in some native languages of New England and Canada's Maritimes.  Delving into, in particular, Abenaki, Maliseet, and Micmac, Cooper finds more than a coincidental correspondence with some words, place names, and concepts in classical Greek.  He wonders if there could have been some Greek influence on the Micmac hieroglyphs, conceivably derived from Libayn Greeks in the period around 500 B.C.  What do you think?

 Now box your compass and join Betty Buckell as she tries to locate the illusive "Norembega" by studying old maps and reports.  While locations bearing that name are found "all over the map" on mainland as well as island features, placement of the island called "Claudia" seems to remain constant.  With Claudia as an anchor, and using reports of pirate Jehan Fonteneau Allefonce, circa 1543, and of the shipwrecked sailor David Ingram, 1568, Betty proposes that the city of Norumbega was on the Hudson River near present-day Poughkeepsie, New York, not on the Penobscot River in Maine as Champlain recorded.

 What box?  We don't see any box!

 The Editors

 

Back Issues:

Back Issues may be obtained for $8.00 each.  Please send check to: NEARA Publications, 94 Cross Point Road, Edgecomb, ME 04556.

 

Transit cover v 22001THE NEARA TRANSIT

As the newsletter/Journal featured more content articles and less on members’ news and activities, it became apparent that a vehicle to continue reporting on members activities would be welcome. In 1989 the NEARA Transit was launched. It now focuses on chapter news, committee reports, members’ activities as well as book notes, commentaries and breaking research news.


 

NEARA MONOGRAPHS

From time to time the publication committee has offered a monograph treating an in-depth study of a subject of special interest to NEARA members.

blindelephants

THE BLIND MEN AND THE ELEPHANTS 

The Davonport Relics Reconsidered

By James L Guthrie

The first in a series of NEARA Monographs

commemorating NEARA's fortieth anniversary.

"Davenport might have been forgotten by now except for two combative men with diametrically opposite views about the likelihood that voyagers from the Old World set foot in America before the Norse. Almost simultaneously, Marshall McKusick and Barry Fell came across material from the Davenport case that reinforced their beliefs and fit their agendas."

So begins the unfolding of a pattern of conflict familiar to NEARA readers. First the anomalous discoveries from 1873 through 1888 of five strangely engraved tablets and more peculiar Hopewell pipes resembling elephants Davenport, Indiana. Then the announcement was picked up by the popular press and authenticity of the artifacts supported by the Davenport Academy of Natural Science an amateur society of mound explorers. By 1882, the authorities of academia expressed doubt, and then disbelief followed in 1883 with the Smithsonian Institution’s cry of fraud or hoax. The controversy simmered and flared up again and again when a new debunker appeared on the scene and the facts became tangled in a web of myths, lies, character assassinations and undisciplined ranting; Marshall McKusick’s publications from 1970 to 1991 being the most egregious.

The Blind Men and the Elephant tells the story of these five inscribed  relics, not only of the Reverend Jacob Gass’ amateur mound excavations in Davenport Iowa and his discoveries, but he covers accounts of the full panoply of players on both sides of a bitter quest for the “truth.”

Guthrie presents his case for authenticity clearly and concisely, presenting the history, buttressing his arguments with careful documentation of his sources, discussing the symbolism, context and possible meaning of each of the five inscribed stones, then giving his linguistic analysis of the symbols. The most convincing evidence however, is in the appendices reproducing the most important primary source documents. Although Marshall McKusick is the prime target of Guthrie’s inquisition, he finds unsustainable scholarship in most of the opinions proffered by the opposition. While chastising Barry Fell for many of the same faults, he credits him with important insights and commends his resoluteness in defending the authenticity of the relics.

As a first rate case study, this NEARA monograph belongs on every NEARA member’s shelf.

The Blind Men and the Elephants:
The Davenport Relics Reconsidered

James L. Guthrie

NEARA Monograph, 2005

Soft cover, 8-1/2x 11 format, 72 pages

Sorry, out of print, watch for more news

NEARA publications, Edgecomb, ME available from NEARA: Order Form


newporttower

The Newport Tower

 Various Authors

compiled by Suzanne Carlson

Introduction by John Dranchak: The Newport Tower - also known as Old Stone Mill - is located in Touro Park, at Newport, Rhode Island on Aquidneck Island. Measuring 28 feet in height and roughly 24 feet in diameter, it is constructed of stone and supported by eight cylindrical columns, which form arches. The interior measures approximately 18 feet in diameter, and is surrounded by walls which are roughly three feet thick. A window, fireplace, and curious nooks add interest to the Tower. Separated from the downtown area with its sailing center and throngs of summer tourists, it is often overlooked as an item of historical interest, and is even ignored by many locals who are unaware of its history. During the heyday of the Newport Rock Festivals in the 1960s and 70s,Aquidneck Island was overrun by hundreds of thousands of young people, and Touro Park was trampled along with much of therest of the city. Those youths had no idea that the Park and its tenant, the Tower, had been, and would continue to be the source of great mystery and controversy as to its origins.

For years, historians espoused the generally accepted belief that the Tower was a mill built during the seventeenth century by Rhode Island’s colonial governor, Benedict Arnold. However, as early as the mid-1800s, alternative theories of the Tower's origin were proposed and have become the subject of controversy—occasionally acrimoni­ous—among scholars, scientists, and researchers. One such theory speculates that the Tower was builtby the Scot Henry Sinclair, believed to have visited the area in the late fourteenth century with a fleet under the command of Antonio Zeno.

NEARA has been a leader in sponsoring a good deal of the research, presenting at various conferences and publishing a number of articles written byNEARA Journal contributors. These activities have examined relevant aspects of comparative architecture, archaeoastronomy, radiocarbon dating, cartography, Templar influences, cryptography, and land surveys, among other factors. Some authors leave us with answered questions, while others offer their conclusions about possible pre-Columbian origins of the Tower.

Because of the broad variety of work accomplished on this subject and the time span over whicharticles have been published, NEARA’s editors feelthe time is right to compile the efforts of our many contributors in a single volume. That is the purpose of this monograph, The Newport Tower "Arnold to Zeno". We hope that readers who have followed the twists and turns of Tower research will revisit the information contained herein, and that those who are new to the subject will find the subject matter intriguing and a catalyst for more reading and study. We have, in some cases, edited the authors' original articles in order to avoid redundancy.

The hope is that someday new evidence will emerge that will conclusively provide the answer to the true origin of the Newport Tower. Meanwhile, we are left with a really good mystery!

As a first rate case study, this NEARA monograph belongs on every NEARA member’s shelf.

The Newport Tower

Various Authors

NEARA Monograph, 2006

Soft cover, 8-1/2x 11 format, 100 pages

NEARA publications, Edgecomb, ME available from NEARA: Order Form

Item of Interest:

The Chronognostic Research Foundation:

An Excavation at the Newport Tower

What is the Newport Tower? Norse? British Colonial? Scottish? Chinese? Portuguese? Basque? Join us as we begin the first archaeological excavation in 60 years in Touro Park, Newport, Rhode Island, to solve this mystery.

With the gracious permission of the Newport City Council, from October 15 to November 15 we’ll conduct an archaeological excavation of sites we found in the park during our geophysical studies of the past three years: possible building foundations and a rocky area near the Tower. The Tower itself, though completely visible and beautiful, is mute; we can only hope that its neighbors underground will be more talkative and tell us their tales from the past, and the tale of the Tower.On these pages [www.chronognostic.org] we’ll provide you with the paper trails we’ve followed through libraries and historical societies: archaeological reports and scientific conference papers, old Danish poems and even older Icelandic sagas, 17th-century wills and marginal notes. You’ll see maps and charts. You can browse through photos of towers, houses, churches, industrial sites, windmills, and lighthouses, and we’ll give you some choices of wallpaper for your computer screen. There will be references aplenty, and web links to the many good people out there in cyberspace who furnished us with information.


beothunkorigins

Beothuk Origins

By John H. Cooper

Introduction by James Guthrie: We know that the original Redskins were the Beothuk Indians of Newfoundland, who painted themselves gaudily with red ochre, but their story of their unique culture and sad demise has remained obscure.  Dr. John Cooper has taken a big step towards filling this gap in our knowledge by summarizing the results of his lifelong studies of these enigmatic people.

First contacted in 1497, these maritime people hung on until June 6, 1829, when the last of the Beothuks, the beautiful and accomplished Shanawdithit, succumbed to disease at the age of 29.  Their numbers had dwindled steadily as they were shot, taken captive, and starved by blockades that cut off vital access to their salmon, seal, and other resources of the sea.  Parts of Cooper's account are painful to read as the quotes early 19th century documentation of the unspeakable atrocities suffered by Beothuks at the hands of the insensitive newcomers.

Beothuks, while apparently descended from the Algonquians of Labrador, were considerably different physically, culturally, and linguistically from mainland Indians.  Was this the result of isolation and an island, or had the Beothuks blended with European mariners who had been active for centuries in Atlantic waters?  Cooper, a pathologist, explores this question, concluding from physical considerations. language, ethnography, and documents such as the Norse sagas that the Beothuks absorbed both Norse and Celtic immigrants in significant numbers.  In the final 25 pages, he examines some 450 Beothuk words, showing that some have cognates in Nordic and Gaelic languages while others are closest to Algonquin, especially Micmac and Montagnais/Naskapi.

There is some impressive scholarship here, and we are grateful that John Cooper has been able to pack so much intriguing and reliable information into sixty pages.  The NEARA volume is superbly produced and edited and will further enhance the growing stature of that organization. 

Beothuk Origins

John H. Cooper

NEARA Monograph, 2007

Soft cover, 8-1/2x 11 format, 60 pages

NEARA publications, Edgecomb, ME available from NEARA: Order Form

 NEARA Monographs may be ordered from;

NEARA Publications
94 Cross Point Road Edgecomb,
ME, 04556

Cost for the Newport Tower is $20 for members or $25 for non-members

The Blind Men and the Elephants $14. for members and $16 for non-members

Beothunk Origins $16. for members or $20. for non-members

A monograph series order form may be downloaded here .

SPECIAL PUBLICATIONS

The Spirit Pond Runestones; out of print

The Spirit Pond Sod House; Edward Lenik

The Newport Tower, The English Elizabethan Solution; Horace Silliman 

Across Before Columbus

The 1998 NEARA-published book, Across Before Columbus? Evidence for Transoceanic Contact with the Americas prior to 1492, presents compelling analysis of artifacts, inscriptions, linguistic and biological traits suggesting numerous contacts over at least the last 5,000 years.

Evidence For Transoceanic Contact with the Americas Prior to 1492

 

Across Before Columbus Proceedings of NEARA Conference held at Brown University, June 1992. Edited by Donald Y. Gilmore and Linda S. McElroy.

Did the astonishing pre-Columbian civilizations of the New World arise in the total isolation from Old World influences? Or did transoceanic contacts over hundreds, even thousands, of years shape the development of civilization on both sides of the oceans?

This volume seeks answers to that controversial question. Stated another way: Did civilization blossom in the Americas through independent invention, or were cultural and physiological traits borrowed - diffused - from civilizations across the seas?

The body of evidence that has come to light principally over the last century is addressed in these pages by the twenty-six pioneering scholars, both university professors and avocational researchers, who have examined evidence in more than a dozen fields related to the invention vs. diffusion question.  Their multi-disciplinary approaches are reviewed by four distinguished scholars as well as by the editors. (See the Table of Contents below.)

The sometimes startling information in this volume grew out of  the Columbian Quincentennial Conference sponsored by the New England Antiquities Research Association - NEARA - and held on the Brown University campus in Providence RI in June 1992.  Some of the papers were published earlier in the NEARA Journal, but all of the material has been updated by the authors to bring the latest developments to a wider audience.



Table Of Contents for Across Before Columbus?

To the Reader (v)

Acknowledgments (vi)

IntroductionGeorge F. Carter (1)

Section I:  Artifacts, Sites, and Archeoastronomy

  • Jomon-Valdivia Similarities: Convergence or Contact? Betty J. Meggers (11)

  • King Juba Remembered: a Working Hypothesis Norman Totten (23)

  • Comalcalco: An Early CLassic Maya Site Neil Steede (35)

  • The Significance of Metallurgy in the Purhepecha Region Celia Heil   (43)

  • The Gungywump Enigma: Serial Occupation in an Ancient New England Site David P. Barron (53)

  • Earth, Stones, and Sky: Universality and the Continuity of American Cosmology James W. Mavor Jr. (57)

  • An Ancient Solar Observatory at Willow Creek, California John H. Rudolph (71)

  • Astronomical Alignments in the Newport Tower William S. Penhallow (85)

  • Commentary - Section I Shadow and Substance Curtis Hoffman (97)

  • Author Responses (104)

Section II:  Botany, Biology, and People

  • Maize Diffused to India before Columbus came to America Carl L. Johanssen (111)

  • The Zuni Enigma Nancy Yaw Davis (125)

  • Dyestuffs and Possible Early Contacts Between Southwestern Asia and Nuclear America Stephen C. Jett (141)

  • The Chicken in America: Spanish Introduction or Pre-Spanish? George F. Carter (151)

  • The Yuchi, American and Asian Joseph P. Mahan (161)

  • Commentary - Section II Peregrination of the Organic Daniel W. Gade (165)

  • Author Responses (167)

Section III:  Linguistics, Inscriptions, and Glyphs

  • The Identification of the Proto-Tifinagh Script at Peterborough, Ontario David H. Kelley (171)

  • American Indian Languages Before Columbus Marie Ritchie Key (183)

  • Early Eurasian Linguistic Links with North America Roger Williams Westcott (193)

  • Some Remarks on an Insrcibed Stone From Grand Traverse County, Michigan Donald P. Buchanan (199)

  • The Bat Creek Stone: A Reply to the Critics J. Huston McCulloch (203)

  • The Decipherment of American Runestones Suzanne O. Carlson (217)

  • The Transmigration of Tanit Gloria Farley (237)

  • Commentary - Section III

Section IV:  Diffusion and Voyages

  • Types of Cultural Diffusion Roger Williams Westcott (255)

  • A European View of Diffusion and Transoceanic Contacts before 1492 Patrick Ferryn (261)

  • Vestiges of the Natural History of Archeology:

  • Setting up the Americas as a Scientific Experiment Alice B. Kehoe (267)

  • The Hebrew Presence in Pre-Columbian America Cyrus H. Gordon (273)

  • Ancient Chinese Maps of the World Donald L. Cyr (279)

  • Columbus was 100% Portuguese Manuel L. DaSilva (283)

  • The Brendan Columbus Connection Paul H. Chapman (287)

  • Commentary - Section IV John L. Sorenson (291)

  • Author Responses (295)

From The Editors (299)
Contributed Biographical Notes (303)
Index (307)